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Not sure this is the right place, if this is possible allowed or otherwise a good idea, but...

AehaliAehali Member Posts: 4
Alright, I found achea through some nostalgia moments late at night one night, saw the new HTML 5 client, and decided to give it a go.

So far I'm overwhelmed, but mostly enjoying myself.  But here comes the problems, Love the HTML 5 client, wouldn't be playing without it, the music, the look everything is great, except for what I'm going to call the "Hotbar" (I'm an MMO Addict, sue me) I've found a way to expand it to 7 buttons, but I have a feeling as I rise in level I'm going to want a Lot more than 7 commands ready quickly.

I do not type fast, so having them buttoned, or linked to key presses is important, which brings me to my question. "How can I, legally within the rules of the game, get more buttons macro'ed, either in the HTML 5 client, or is it possible to download a stand alone client with the same look and feel and Sound that would give me more buttons to macro stuff with?"

Comments

  • TectonTecton The Garden of the GodsAdministrator Posts: 2,507 Admin
    Hi Aehali!

    The client can expand up to 12 buttons there easily, you can click on the settings button (the little gears icon in the lower-right), then going to the buttons tab and adjusting the button count on the drop-down list!

    You can also add non-button keybinds by clicking on the reflexes tab! This will allow you to macro commands to key combinations too. Just click on "Add" then "Add a keybind".

    Hope this helps!
    Aehali
  • AehaliAehali Member Posts: 4
    Thanks, it does!
  • TahquilTahquil Member Posts: 4,337 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    Just as an add on :

    There is both Mudlet and Mush clients where you can create your own GUI. Take a look at this thread to see some of the great work people have done. If you look on the 7th page you can see Jonathin has made a GUI with a lot of buttons which sounds like something you would like.

    Pros of using external clients compared to Nexus:
    -can customise your GUI to anything you want
    -you are in complete control of it
    -What you can do is limited to what you understand about coding

    Cons
    -What you can do is limited to what you understand about coding (double-edged sword, if you suck at coding you're going to have a hard time)
    - Players go dormant which sucks if you don't know how to change your GUI in the future while the Nexus client will always be updated by IRE.
  • AehaliAehali Member Posts: 4
    Yeah, I know.... very little coding, basically barely passed my C+ class years ago, actually not sure I passed remembering it, or misremembering as the case may be.  Now, if someone had coded the HTML 5, client already and I could just drop and play it into an external program, that I might be more inclined to use.

    But thanks for the options.

    Honestly Ideally that's what I'd love, someone to Pull down the HTML 5 client into a stand alone program I could add more buttons to, turn the game into a text based MMO like experience with a focus on role play.  The one concern I have about using the Reflexes tab is, I'm not sure it'll give me a visual que as to what's binded where, I hardly ever use click buttons, but the fact that they are there reminds me what the key press is supposed to do.
  • AhmetAhmet Wherever I wanna beMember Posts: 3,370 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    Aehali said:
    Yeah, I know.... very little coding, basically barely passed my C+ class years ago, actually not sure I passed remembering it, or misremembering as the case may be.  Now, if someone had coded the HTML 5, client already and I could just drop and play it into an external program, that I might be more inclined to use.

    But thanks for the options.

    Honestly Ideally that's what I'd love, someone to Pull down the HTML 5 client into a stand alone program I could add more buttons to, turn the game into a text based MMO like experience with a focus on role play.  The one concern I have about using the Reflexes tab is, I'm not sure it'll give me a visual que as to what's binded where, I hardly ever use click buttons, but the fact that they are there reminds me what the key press is supposed to do.
    jQuery is a wonderful wonderful thing.
    Huh. Neat.
  • AehaliAehali Member Posts: 4
    jQuery?  Care to elaborate?
  • KlendathuKlendathu Eye of the StormMember Posts: 3,178 @@ - Legendary Achaean

    Tharos, the Announcer of Delos shouts, "It's near the end of the egghunt and I still haven't figured out how to pronounce Clean-dat-hoo."
  • TharvisTharvis The Land of Beer and Chocolate!Member Posts: 3,107 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    @Aehali if you need a quick course for coding (javascript for the HTML client)
    take a look here : https://www.khanacademy.org/computing/computer-programming
    Aurora says, "Tharvis, why are you always breaking things?!"
    Artemis says, "You are so high maintenance, Tharvis, gosh."
    Tecton says, "It's still your fault, Tharvis."

  • MorkadoMorkado Seattle, WAMember Posts: 27 ✭✭ - Stalwart
    Tbh, there are so many GUI packages available for Mudlet and the community is so big, I would suggest that route. Also, (IMHO), Lua is easier to learn and easier to read than Javascript. Lua documentation is very good, widely available, and Mudlet's website includes it's own basic tutorial for getting started in Lua and Mudlet.

    http://www.mudlet.org/   -- Mudlet website, click Downloads to download the newest version
    http://wiki.mudlet.org/w/Main_Page  -- Mudlet Wiki, great information on both Lua and Mudlet
    http://forums.mudlet.org  -- Mudlet Forums, great place to ask questions, get help, find scripts

    http://www.lua.org/pil/contents.html  -- Programming in Lua, first edition. Aimed at a slightly earlier version of Lua than the current, however, it is still largely relevant. I would highly suggest reading through it, testing the code it presents, and start tinkering with other people's scripts in Mudlet.

    As a full stack developer proficient in C, C++, C#, Javascript, Ruby, Python, PHP, Perl, and Lua, I can honestly attest to the fact that Lua was the language I had the most fun learning and found myself able to write non-trivial code in with the least amount of effort. A lot of the reasons I (and many others) like it are the same reasons it was chosen as the primary scripting language for Mudlet.

    I'm not saying you have to use it -- I also really like the HTML5 client, but it really is a great client and it’s really nice to be able to create scripts that you think would be useful。
    There is even an in-game clan for Mudlet/Lua scripting where you can get help from lots of players who will know what you’re going through and what you’re trying to accomplish。 That’s a huge bonus!
  • AhmetAhmet Wherever I wanna beMember Posts: 3,370 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    Morkado said:
    Tbh, there are so many GUI packages available for Mudlet and the community is so big, I would suggest that route. Also, (IMHO), Lua is easier to learn and easier to read than Javascript. Lua documentation is very good, widely available, and Mudlet's website includes it's own basic tutorial for getting started in Lua and Mudlet.

    http://www.mudlet.org/   -- Mudlet website, click Downloads to download the newest version
    http://wiki.mudlet.org/w/Main_Page  -- Mudlet Wiki, great information on both Lua and Mudlet
    http://forums.mudlet.org  -- Mudlet Forums, great place to ask questions, get help, find scripts

    http://www.lua.org/pil/contents.html  -- Programming in Lua, first edition. Aimed at a slightly earlier version of Lua than the current, however, it is still largely relevant. I would highly suggest reading through it, testing the code it presents, and start tinkering with other people's scripts in Mudlet.

    As a full stack developer proficient in C, C++, C#, Javascript, Ruby, Python, PHP, Perl, and Lua, I can honestly attest to the fact that Lua was the language I had the most fun learning and found myself able to write non-trivial code in with the least amount of effort. A lot of the reasons I (and many others) like it are the same reasons it was chosen as the primary scripting language for Mudlet.

    I'm not saying you have to use it -- I also really like the HTML5 client, but it really is a great client and it’s really nice to be able to create scripts that you think would be useful。
    There is even an in-game clan for Mudlet/Lua scripting where you can get help from lots of players who will know what you’re going through and what you’re trying to accomplish。 That’s a huge bonus!
    You are evil. Stop this nonsense.
    Huh. Neat.
  • MorkadoMorkado Seattle, WAMember Posts: 27 ✭✭ - Stalwart
    Did not realize I had activated my Chinese keyboard while typing that post out. My apologies.

    Still, though - learn Lua! :D
    Yae
  • AntoniusAntonius Member Posts: 4,904 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    The only advantage of Lua is the Mudlet clan. In terms of other resources, JavaScript has great documentation, tutorials, etc. I've always found the documentation available for JavaScript much better than Lua documentation.

    Ultimately, it doesn't matter which you learn first. Switching between the two is pretty trivial.
  • MorkadoMorkado Seattle, WAMember Posts: 27 ✭✭ - Stalwart
    Hrm, I think the way I worded my post suggested that I felt there wasn't good documentation for JavaScript. That's certainly not one of the comparisons I was trying to draw. Javascript has been around for a long time and had a great many resources to learn from. I just feel that Lua is slightly more legible to a non-coder and the benefit of the in-game clan can not be understated. If you go the Javascript route, there will be less Achaea-specific help available.


  • AhmetAhmet Wherever I wanna beMember Posts: 3,370 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    edited July 2015
    Antonius said:
    The only advantage of Lua is the Mudlet clan. In terms of other resources, JavaScript has great documentation, tutorials, etc. I've always found the documentation available for JavaScript much better than Lua documentation.

    Ultimately, it doesn't matter which you learn first. Switching between the two is pretty trivial.
    I'd have to say lua is a lot simpler to learn, a lot less syntax heavy, and a lot more forgiving of mistakes. Plus when you're using mudlet as opposed to html, fucking up one DOM element doesn't fuck up the whole rest of the page. Tecton and crew have done some great work on the html client, but I'd still whole-heartedly suggest Mudlet. 

    EDIT: plus it's -really- easy to find third party scripts for just about anything you want to do in mudlet.
    Huh. Neat.
    MorkadoBrean
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