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thinking of getting SVO..

NovakNovak Member Posts: 52 ✭✭ - Stalwart
I wonder though should I save up my credits to get it or wait until I trans my skills to get it?

Comments

  • TasleusTasleus Member Posts: 84 ✭✭✭ - Distinguished
    it's worth getting it as soon as you can, but I'd highly advise trying to build your own system FIRST.

    That way, you're not using a system without knowing what it's for.
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    Sylvance
  • IdelisaIdelisa Member Posts: 385 ✭✭✭✭ - Eminent
    <.<

    Just get it as soon as you can. I suggest buying it with RL money, too.  I'm pretty sure @Vadimuses does it for a living, so you're supporting a small business.
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  • AeolithonAeolithon Member Posts: 88 ✭✭✭ - Distinguished
    I'd strongly suggest you get Svo.
    Cahin
  • CahinCahin Member Posts: 1,246 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    edited December 2012
    Alternatively there is a free system if you are using mudlet, which I'm assuming you are if you're considering svo.


    It's all open-sourced and you're free to do with it whatever you want except sell it.

    @Idelisa Where did you hear Vadi did svo to make a living?

    MahtTvistorSylvance
  • MahtMaht Member Posts: 78 ✭✭ - Stalwart
    edited December 2012
    Echoing Cahin's post - download Omnipave. Svo's main appeal over other curing systems is the incredible amount of utility and hand-holding that it brings, but a lot of those features are lost on someone your level/might/etc. Have some fun with Omnipave before you decide to spend any money/credits, or simply stick with it because it is a great curing system.
    Sylvance
  • IdelisaIdelisa Member Posts: 385 ✭✭✭✭ - Eminent
    @Cahin, I didn't mean that he did it TO make a living.  A poor choice of words. I agree with @Tasleus on the point of knowing what SVO is doing, but to some people it's just too frustrating trying to make your own system.  
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  • KadenKaden Member Posts: 460 ✭✭✭✭ - Eminent
    Of course, no one's even asked if he knows enough to make his own system, which is another reason one would consider purchasing SVO (heaven knows I can't code worth a damn). In any case, if you have a friend who uses it, then just harken to their experiences and the documentation with all its explanations on how to use stuff is your friend. -nod-
    NimSylvance
  • NovakNovak Member Posts: 52 ✭✭ - Stalwart
    @Kaden I don't know jack about coding. lol so making my own system isn't a option.
    IdelisaSylvance
  • TreyTrey Member Posts: 4,800 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    edited December 2012
    I think more of what @Tasleus is trying to say is 'take the time to learn how to cure properly, the mechanics behind everything like herb balance, salve balance, etc.'. I'm of the mindset that that's the common trend among top-tier fighters, that they understand curing in and out, upside down and backwards.

    EDIT: Fixed the name of the person whose post I was referencing. Ironically, my apparently blind self mistook @Tasleus for @Tanris
    Post edited by Trey on

    Sylvance
  • EldEld Member Posts: 3,946 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    edited December 2012
    It really depends on the person, though. If you've got some programming experience and enjoy doing it, building your own curing starting with really basic triggers and working up can be a great way to learn about the mechanics of Achaean combat. Personally, I've never regretting going that route, even if two years down the road my curing's not half as good as svo or Omnipave, and probably never will be.

    Edit: Should learn to refresh threads before commenting. @Trey's interpretation of @Tasleus's (not @Tanris) comment sounds about right. A curing system should basically just be automating what someone who knows how to cure would do if they could process everything quickly enough to make intelligent decisions. A solid understanding of the mechanics, whether it comes through trying to build your own system (not an option for everyone), spending time in the arena with people at a similar level of knowledge while at low levels learning to cure manually, or just jumping in to using a premade system and taking the time to understand what it does and why, is going to be essential if you want to get anywhere with combat.
  • TanrisTanris Member Posts: 683 @ - Epic Achaean

    Not sure why you'd pay for a system when you can get an equally good one for free, but maybe I'm just stingy.

    Both omni and svo are solid systems. They'd do better if they followed the tried and true herbal naming convention, but maybe Carmain at least will have an enlightened moment given his current transcendent state.

    IdelisaZeon
  • MishgulMishgul ROTHERHAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAMMember Posts: 5,372 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    omnipave is free and the code is open fory ou to see too so you can learn how it works and fix it when it fails for you. There is plenty of support around for it and a few people are adding thigns to it to make it cooler.

    -

    One of the symptoms of an approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that one's work is terribly important

    As drawn by Shayde
    hic locus est ubi mors gaudet succurrere vitae
  • NovakNovak Member Posts: 52 ✭✭ - Stalwart
    Ok I d/led the Omni, hopefully I know how to use it.


    I'll think about Svo some more.
    Idelisa
  • IdelisaIdelisa Member Posts: 385 ✭✭✭✭ - Eminent
    One thing that's especially nice about Omni (or so I'm told, as I've never used it) is that it encompasses all classes, so if you switch you don't have to worry about buying a new system like you do with SVO.
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    TasleusLodiSherazad
  • TasleusTasleus Member Posts: 84 ✭✭✭ - Distinguished
    edited December 2012
    Trey said:
    I think more of what @Tasleus is trying to say is 'take the time to learn how to cure properly, the mechanics behind everything like herb balance, salve balance, etc.'. I'm of the mindset that that's the common trend among top-tier fighters, that they understand curing in and out, upside down and backwards.

    EDIT: Fixed the name of the person whose post I was referencing. Ironically, my apparently blind self mistook @Tasleus for @Tanris
    Yup, that's exactly what I'm saying. I didn't necessarily mean "Learn LUA Now." I meant more along the lines of "It's good for you to learn all the curing and stuff on your own, because if you don't and something goes wrong with SVO, you're just gonna wind up ragequitting." 

    As for the edit : It's hilarious that you mistook @Tanris for me, because he actually killed me during the demigod raid on Cyrene last night :D 
    Idelisa said:
    One thing that's especially nice about Omni (or so I'm told, as I've never used it) is that it encompasses all classes, so if you switch you don't have to worry about buying a new system like you do with SVO.

    @Idelisa is VERY correct here -- that's the big downfall of SVO -- yes, it holds your hand and is really nicely built, but it's tied to your character and your class. Do bear that in mind.
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  • AchillesAchilles Los AngelesMember Posts: 2,540 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    It really depends on how you like spending your time.

    SVO is great if you love hunting, want to do some group fighting and know which priorities to change for different classes (something that takes a lot of tinkering) in duels.  Out of the box it is easier to deal with.

    Omnipave is great if you have interest in learning how to code as its more open and it can be easily modified.  It definitely speeds up the learning curve.

    I don't recommend anyone to build their own system from scratch at this point, the time investment would not make sense.  Take one of the existing systems and build/modify it.  You'll spend a ton of time just making your offensive system as it is.


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    Novak
  • XithXith Member Posts: 2,602 @@ - Legendary Achaean

    The way I see it, Omnipave would be better if you actually want to modify the system and risk screwing it up, so if you're not any form of coding wiz, Svo is good. It's also largely open and modifyable (except parts of the core of the system). And of course I like it because it's pretty and professional.

    I wouldn't say either is technically better, but Vadi works a number of neat features and offers other addons into Svo. With pvp, it's largely the person that wins a fight rather than a system.

    Because Vadi has paying customers, he'll always be regularly updating and improving his system. If you plan to play Achaea more than 4 hours a week, it's well worth the $20.

    When I first started on Nexus (no coding knowledge at all) I made my own system to an extent, but things got tough when it came to limb curing. And it didn't account for herb balances and such the way a system should, and priorities weren't solid because I didn't understand curing/combat like I do now. So the Vadi-Nexus system was awesome. I regularly sparred and it served its purpose.

    The nature of fighting is to keep on the offensive enough that you aren't always on the defensive, because that gives people the time to prep you uninterrupted. On the other hand, with a major curing system and doing nothing but diagnose every few hits, you should be able to avoid most locks.

    tl;dr - get Svo. It's worth it and the only disadvantages will come from your own combat knowledge.

    I like my steak like I like my Magic cards: mythic rare.
  • OgnogOgnog Member Posts: 284 ✭✭✭✭ - Eminent
    Tasleus said:
    it's worth getting it as soon as you can, but I'd highly advise trying to build your own system FIRST.

    That way, you're not using a system without knowing what it's for.
    Get SVO. It makes a huge difference, and would take even a professional programmer many months to get even close to the level of refinement SVO provides. But I do agree with Tasleus that it's important to learn the mechanics of using your skills and curing so that you aren't completely reliant on the system, and can understand what SVO is doing and why.

  • JamethielJamethiel AdelaideMember Posts: 131 ✭✭✭ - Distinguished
    In Mudlet, you can also make different profiles. For example, 'Profile X with Vadi', 'Profile X with Omni' and 'Profile X with My Own System'. You can call them what you want.

    This may be of use as:
    1. When you're not tinkering you can use a profile that has Omnipave or Vadi and know that you're using a system that isn't likely to do odd things to you or miss a heap of stuff
    2. You could, if you had both, switch between one or the other to see what they are like - this would require a log out and back in though
    3. You could tinker with Omnipave in a 'Profile X with Omni with My Ideas' and still have an Omnipave 'profile' that isn't broken (trust me, I tinker with my system occasionally and it falls in a heap)
    There are a few caveats or cons:
    1. Logging, if you use it, will be over the three profiles so you'd have to look for stuff over three profile directories
    2. To switch between you'd have to log in and log out
    The other way you could go is have some 'uber-groups' called 'Vadi', 'Omni', 'OmniModded' and put all of SVO under Vadi, all of Omni under Omni and another Omni under OmniModded and then turn the groups on and off as you want.

    Also, if you know where Mudlet stores its configuration and you do something particularly silly (which as noted occasionally I do), it stores backups of every single configuration when you log out or save the profile. Hence, you can go back and after a bit of fussing about rewind yourself back to the one that worked. I had to do that when I totally broke myself and just couldn't figure out what I'd done wrong.

    I have never used OmniPave however Vadi's system, or SVO, has a number of tweaks and configurations in it and one can approach learning combat from bottom up - have no system and then build one - but also top down - get a system, figure out why it prioritises this over that. There's no reason you can't do both.
    TvistorSylvance
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