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Resources for Writing Help

KayeilKayeil Washington StateMember Posts: 2,650 @@ - Legendary Achaean
I know for some English is not their first language here, and for others it may be your first language, but perhaps you still have a list of bad writing habits you'd like to improve upon. I figured it might be helpful for us to post various resources for writing whether it be general grammar, design terms, etc. So I'd like to start off with my own list of things that I may look to sometimes, although I still highly recommend asking peers in Achaea to look over your work because it does help a great deal. Feel free to post any of your own resources that you have found help you out when you're writing.

  • Grammarly: Helps improve your writing and corrects it up to ten times better than a word processor. Supposedly the world's most accurate grammar checker, and far more accurate than MS Word. You can also set it to check using British English instead of American English, where MS Word only uses American English. The British English part helps because that is what is used here in Achaea.
  • Grammarly Blog: Grammarly's blog with different articles on writing tips, and common mistakes that people make while writing. Lots of great information here.
  • Thesaurus: Because every writer should get familiar with a thesaurus for suggestions of using different synonyms and antonyms with their descriptive writing.
  • 178 Ways to Describe Women's Clothing
  • The Phrontistery: Plenty of lists in the glossary on words for everything from fabrics, combat, worship, etc. All kinds of tools you can use here.
  • Words to describe colours
What doesn't kill you gives you exp.

ShirszaeGamdenSiduriAlcaroAereidhnaTrillianaSenaHalosEhene

Comments

  • KayeilKayeil Washington StateMember Posts: 2,650 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    For anyone interested in Achaean architecture, I had started this thread before that has some of my resources, and the ideas that others have posted.
    What doesn't kill you gives you exp.

    SiduriAereidhna
  • KadenKaden Member Posts: 418 ✭✭✭✭ - Eminent
    If English as a second language is a concern, I would advise against the thesaurus. Mostly because it gives synonyms and antonyms without noting that the word might have additional connotations that might change or color what they want to say. There's nothing wrong with using the most common word. I love weird and obscure words as much as the next geek/nerd but we do have to remember not to sacrifice clarity or fall into the trap of thinking that verbosity equals substance.
    ShirszaeSobriquet
  • KayeilKayeil Washington StateMember Posts: 2,650 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    Kaden said:
    If English as a second language is a concern, I would advise against the thesaurus. Mostly because it gives synonyms and antonyms without noting that the word might have additional connotations that might change or color what they want to say. There's nothing wrong with using the most common word. I love weird and obscure words as much as the next geek/nerd but we do have to remember not to sacrifice clarity or fall into the trap of thinking that verbosity equals substance.
    I think that depends on the English language skills of the person, though. There's some people here who don't speak English as their first language, but they're fabulous writers anyways, and I think they have enough command of the language to use a thesaurus just as well. Some of them are even better writers than some people who have English as their first language.
    What doesn't kill you gives you exp.

    ShirszaeAereidhna
  • MalforinMalforin Member Posts: 9
    edited November 2015
    So when I made my first fantasy character I struggle to know how exactly to go about it. Whilst this is more for those writing Novels, I found Brandon Sanderson's lectures nice to work from. (Author of Mistborn Trilogy, Stormlight Archives, Alcatraz and finished Robert Jordans - Wheel of time series. Just to name a few). Each section is between 10 - 20 minutes long.

     What makes a great Character.

    Ways to Humanize Characters.

    The Superman and the Everyman.

    Character Flaws & Handicaps Pt 1.

     Character Flaws & Handicaps Pt 2.

    Making Characters Proactive.

    Limitations are Interesting.

    KayeilShirszaeBelerofonHalos
  • MarkeMarke Member Posts: 5
    Additionally, anyone interested in writing should check out Jim Butcher's lectures. I've whiled away so many hours listening to that man talk(huge Butcher and Sanderson fan). 
    KasyaAereidhnaTrilliana
  • AlcaroAlcaro Member Posts: 153 ✭✭✭ - Distinguished
    As someone who's been writing for most of her life [stfu I know sixteen years isn't a long life], the best advice I can give is this:
    • Read a lot. The more you read, the more you'll know, in more ways than one. Trust me on this. Sometimes I watch Spartacus with the subtitles on and then when I go to roleplay a scene, I find that my "style" of writing has been influenced by the vibes of the show. It's really incredible.
    • Reread your emotes before you send them. Not just to check for general spelling and grammar errors, but also to check for flow. Flow is so important because it relates to how others perceive what you've written. The above tip also comes into play here -- the more you've read, the better your eye for proper flow is. You'll be able to tell when something could/should be worded better or phrased differently. For example ..
    He was tall and thin with a long narrow face and looked exhausted.
    But when the same sentence is rewritten for optimal flow, we get this: Tall and thin with a long narrow face, he looked exhausted.
    The bag lady wore a ragged overcoat and she trudged along, pushing a shopping cart full of junk.
       After being rewritten, it's this: The bag lady, who wore a ragged overcoat, trudged along, pushing a shopping cart full of junk.

    Alternatively, it could also go something like this: Her ragged overcoat hanging on her thin frame, the bag lady trudged along, pushing a shopping cart overloaded with junk. Personally, I like the second option because it flows more to my liking. Everyone has different preferences and this leads me to my third and final tip.
    “We are all apprentices in a craft where no one ever becomes a master," The great Hemingway once said. He also said: “There is no rule on how to write. Sometimes it comes easily and perfectly; sometimes it's like drilling rock and then blasting it out with charges."
    There is no fixed definition or way to roleplay or write correctly. Writing style differs from author to author, roleplayer to roleplayer. And that's 100% okay. So if you feel like you can't "get it right", remind yourself that there is no right or wrong way. You set the rules on how you write. If someone doesn't like it, fuck them, 'coz at the end of the day, your opinion is the only one that matters.
    (XXXX): Peak says, "You worry me."
    BelerofonLintonShirszae
  • BelerofonBelerofon Member Posts: 10
    I am finding this really inspiring at the moment.

    http://templeofart.net/
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