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  • MishgulMishgul Trondheim, NorwayMember Posts: 5,378 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    Any sentence uttered by Proficy is a grammar nazi's nightmare.

    -

    One of the symptoms of an approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that one's work is terribly important

    As drawn by Shayde
    hic locus est ubi mors gaudet succurrere vitae
    KatzchenTvistorAlyssea
  • SherazadSherazad Planef UrthMember Posts: 956 @ - Epic Achaean
    Mishgul said:
    Any sentence uttered by Proficy is a grammar nazi's nightmare.
    I think Priyer was worse. 
    Bleh, work ate my gaming life.
    내가 제일 잘 나가!!!111!!1


    Zeon
  • CardanCardan The GardenMember Posts: 437 Immortal
    Iocun said:
    I have issues with other such English homophones which also share the same, similar-sounding translation in German. Took me quite long to get price/prize right, which are both "Preis" in German.
    It gets messy when people use the same word for completely different meanings like 'award' - as in a prize for winning (auszeichnung), as a level of pay for work (preis), or as a way of giving something like awarding a prize (verleihung)
    Keres
  • OceanaOceana North SeaMember Posts: 906 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    Cardan said:
    Iocun said:
    I have issues with other such English homophones which also share the same, similar-sounding translation in German. Took me quite long to get price/prize right, which are both "Preis" in German.
    It gets messy when people use the same word for completely different meanings like 'award' - as in a prize for winning (auszeichnung), as a level of pay for work (preis), or as a way of giving something like awarding a prize (verleihung)
    It is "prijs" in Dutch. One word for both. I -still- have to stop and think "am I using the right one?" every time I use price/prize.
  • SybillaSybilla LondonMember Posts: 503 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    Price: how much does it Cost?

    Prize: I hope I won a Zebra from my mystery gift bag. 

    Zebras are the most prized creatures, and their price reflects this accordingly...
    Oceana
  • KenwayKenway San FranciscoMember Posts: 1,130 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    I hate when people write Serapis when they mean Sarapis...

    Three times...

    Oops.

    Also, the first homework assignment in my first year English class was to listen to this.

    That was a really weird class....

    - Limb Counter - Fracture Relapsing -
    "Honestly, I just love that it counts limbs." - Mizik Corten
  • AdetAdet Member Posts: 273 ✭✭✭✭ - Eminent
    edited February 2013
    Sybilla said:
    Price: how much does it Cost?

    Prize: I hope I won a Zebra from my mystery gift bag. 

    Zebras are the most prized creatures, and their price reflects this accordingly...




    You're giving away a zebra in the raffle?  How much did that cost?
    Post edited by Adet on
  • SybillaSybilla LondonMember Posts: 503 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    @Adet Not too much, all the other prizes are overzealous zippers, so I saved quite a bit of coin.
  • TrevizeTrevize Member Posts: 1,517 @ - Epic Achaean
    I'm not sure if it's been mentioned, but 'who' vs 'whom'.

    'Whom' is not old English. 'Whom' is referring to the object. 'Who' is referring to the subject.

    If you just can't get it, use who. Random 'whoms' incorrectly is painful to read!
    Current scripts: GoldTracker 1.2, mData 1.1
    Site: https://github.com/trevize-achaea/scripts/releases
    Thread: http://forums.achaea.com/discussion/4064/trevizes-scripts
    Latest update: 9/26/2015 better character name handling in GoldTracker, separation of script and settings, addition of gold report and gold distribute aliases.
    KryptonCamande
  • KryptonKrypton shi-KhurenaMember Posts: 2,377 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    Trevize said:
    I'm not sure if it's been mentioned, but 'who' vs 'whom'.

    'Whom' is not old English. 'Whom' is referring to the object. 'Who' is referring to the subject.

    If you just can't get it, use who. Random 'whoms' incorrectly is painful to read!

    To know when to use "who" versus "whom," replace the word with "he/him." If "he" is correct, use "who." If "him" is correct, use "whom."

    "Who likes cheese?" is correct because "He likes cheese?" is correct.

    "You want to get your sexy on with WHOM?!" is correct because "You want to get your sexy on with HIM?!" is correct.

    LiancaOceanaTrevizeWysteria
  • JonathinJonathin Retired in a hole.Member Posts: 3,423 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    Bump. Because this is a good thread and I don't want to see it taken out back and shot.

    My site will remain up, but will not be maintained. The repository will continue to have scripts added to it if I decide to play another game. Maybe I'll see you around in Starmourn!
    Tutorials and scripts  The Repository

    Oceana
  • SybillaSybilla LondonMember Posts: 503 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    Practice and practise, though I think it's a British English thing and Americans (or others?) don't make the distinction. I think one's the verb and one's the noun, but I can never work out which.
  • EldEld Member Posts: 3,946 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    Odd, I'd always assumed "practise" was just a British spelling of "practice". Are the two generally pronounced differently?
  • SybillaSybilla LondonMember Posts: 503 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    edited March 2013
    @Eld not as far as I've noticed. A doctor's practice, and practise medicine sound the same (at least to me, I'm not a mothertongue speaker though).

    Edit to add: advice and advise are pronounced differently though. The first is a bit like add-vais, the second is add-vaaiz.
    Oceana
  • EldEld Member Posts: 3,946 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    Sybilla said:
    @Eld not as far as I've noticed. A doctor's practice, and practise medicine sound the same (at least to me, I'm not a mothertongue speaker though).

    Edit to add: advice and advise are pronounced differently though. The first is a bit like add-vais, the second is add-vaaiz.
    Yes, that I knew (we do have that distinction here in the New World). That's what prompted me to ask about the other.
  • TrevizeTrevize Member Posts: 1,517 @ - Epic Achaean

    Krypton said:
    Trevize said:
    I'm not sure if it's been mentioned, but 'who' vs 'whom'.

    'Whom' is not old English. 'Whom' is referring to the object. 'Who' is referring to the subject.

    If you just can't get it, use who. Random 'whoms' incorrectly is painful to read!

    To know when to use "who" versus "whom," replace the word with "he/him." If "he" is correct, use "who." If "him" is correct, use "whom."

    "Who likes cheese?" is correct because "He likes cheese?" is correct.

    "You want to get your sexy on with WHOM?!" is correct because "You want to get your sexy on with HIM?!" is correct.

    Never thought of it like that, but yes, good rule!
    Current scripts: GoldTracker 1.2, mData 1.1
    Site: https://github.com/trevize-achaea/scripts/releases
    Thread: http://forums.achaea.com/discussion/4064/trevizes-scripts
    Latest update: 9/26/2015 better character name handling in GoldTracker, separation of script and settings, addition of gold report and gold distribute aliases.
  • KryptonKrypton shi-KhurenaMember Posts: 2,377 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    edited March 2013

    Speaking of "who/whom," I was positively livid when, during a joke about proper grammar (starts at 0:54), the writers at SNL misused "whomever"!

    http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/weekend-update-favorites-2913/n32597

    Trevize
  • AnaidianaAnaidiana Member Posts: 834 @ - Epic Achaean

    Achaea said:

    Message #13         Sent by Achaea
    3/30/22:18 Your bug report (detail: Vingar idly strokes the gleaming sword at his side as he checks out his surrounds. (should be surroundings?) (this is in the rodestrian settlement in the southern vashnars)) - has been removed because it is not a bug (usually meaning that this is the way things are intended to be). Please accept our apologies for any inconvenience or misunderstanding that may be involved. The following notes were included: .
    ....what am I missing here?  :(


    image
  • EldEld Member Posts: 3,946 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    Looks like a form of definition 2 here, for example.
    AnaidianaDelphinus
  • MannimarMannimar Member Posts: 990 @ - Epic Achaean
    ValdenHaldonKaitali
  • NimNim Member Posts: 2,015 @@ - Legendary Achaean

    Is it sad that, while I knew most of those things (I was a bit iffy on lie vs lay, but only to the degree that my understanding was less clear than the video's explanation!), my mind was blown on the "fewer" vs "less" thing, and I immediately wondered if "less-than" (in programming) is thus grammatically wrong given that all programming variables are, by nature, discrete and thus arguably countable?

    oh god, I have to completely rethink my entire world view now.

  • EldEld Member Posts: 3,946 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    Nim said:

    Is it sad that, while I knew most of those things (I was a bit iffy on lie vs lay, but only to the degree that my understanding was less clear than the video's explanation!), my mind was blown on the "fewer" vs "less" thing, and I immediately wondered if "less-than" (in programming) is thus grammatically wrong given that all programming variables are, by nature, discrete and thus arguably countable?

    oh god, I have to completely rethink my entire world view now.

    The admonition not to use less for countable things (e.g. "I give less than two craps if you think this sentence is ungrammatical") is another of those innumerable "rules" that originated with some dude in the 18th century or so deciding he liked it better and other people deciding to follow him on it for some reason. Less has been used like that since at least the 9th century. It's fine.
    SenaNim
  • KryptonKrypton shi-KhurenaMember Posts: 2,377 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    Nim said:

    I immediately wondered if "less-than" (in programming) is thus grammatically wrong given that all programming variables are, by nature, discrete and thus arguably countable?

    No. The problem is that there is an important addendum to the "fewer vs. less" grammatical rule that most people aren't aware of, and that hardly gets mentioned. This addendum is that numbersamounts, and measurements are always referred to with "less." It is grammatically INCORRECT to use "fewer" in the following fashions:

    • The boy is fewer than seven years of age.
    • I weigh fewer than 160 pounds.
    • Three is fewer than five.
    • His house is fewer than four miles away.
    • I have fewer than ten dollars on me.

    "Less" should be used instead in all these cases, as it is the total amount that's important, and not the individual pounds, years, miles, etc.

    Also, that mental_floss video sucks! It misspells "possess"/"possessive," and it states that "effect" absolutely cannot be used as a verb, when it in fact can be.

    OceanaPhaestus
  • KeresKeres Member Posts: 109 ✭✭✭ - Distinguished
    @Krypton is my new hero.
    "Under all that we think, lives all that we believe, like the ultimate veil of our spirits." --Antonio Machado
    "The belief that becomes truth for me is that which allows me the best use of my strength, the best means of putting my virtues into action." --Andre Gide
    "It is not enough to have a good mind; the main thing is to use it well."  --Rene Descartes
  • EldEld Member Posts: 3,946 @@ - Legendary Achaean
    Krypton said:

    Also, that mental_floss video sucks! It misspells "possess"/"possessive," and it states that "effect" absolutely cannot be used as a verb, when it in fact can be.

    Just as affect can be a noun.
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