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Computer Building

AesgarAesgar Posts: 363Member ✭✭✭✭ - Eminent
Hey all! Looking to build a desktop over the next few months. I figured this was a great place to start and get some advice and ideas, considering that many of you have done this already. I figure if I am going to invest the time and energy of doing this, I might as well invest some money to ensure the longevity and quality of the system (something I have not found in laptops). 

I suppose to start, where do you recommend part shopping? Any specific parts you would recommend (such as a good case to start with)? Would you recommend going entirely from scratch, or one of the cases with some parts already loaded up. 

I suppose we'll go from there and see how this goes!
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Comments

  • SolnirSolnir Posts: 362Member ✭✭✭✭ - Eminent
    https://pcpartpicker.com/
    That's a good site to start.
    Aldwic
  • RangorRangor Posts: 2,886Member @@ - Legendary Achaean
    Budget budget budget. What is the budget? :)
    image
    XiasCaelan
  • DaironDairon Posts: 250Member ✭✭✭ - Distinguished
    Parts seem to be pretty expensive right now, but I hear they're projected to get ever more expensive!
  • AesgarAesgar Posts: 363Member ✭✭✭✭ - Eminent

    Rangor said:
    Budget budget budget. What is the budget? :)
    Hmm. Let's go with $1300? Could push a bit higher if necessary, not sure what these usually run but I have heard it is around that for something good.

  • AntidasAntidas Posts: 1,331Member @@ - Legendary Achaean
    https://www.newegg.com is where I do all my computer shopping stuff. If you're going to build your computer I'd recommend doing it from scratch. Otherwise, you're paying extra for having those parts put into a case where you could just put them in yourself.

    Most important thing is to make sure the parts you get are all compatible with each other. You'll need to check the speed/type of RAM you need for whichever motherboard you pick. Make sure the GPU you chose is compatible with the motherboard as well. The rest of the stuff is pretty generic and should work with anything.

    Happy to sit down with you at some point in-game and go over what you'll need, but it requires questions and such, so I don't really wanna do it on forums haha

    AesgarXiasCaelan
  • AesgarAesgar Posts: 363Member ✭✭✭✭ - Eminent
    AMD seems like the budget friendly processor, and competitive with Intel on performance from what I am reading. Doubt it is anything I would really notice as I spend the majority of my time on Achaea, though I would like the option to try some new games since I actually can. 
  • JacenJacen Posts: 2,243Member @@ - Legendary Achaean
    Antidas said:
    Most important thing is to make sure the parts you get are all compatible with each other. You'll need to check the speed/type of RAM you need for whichever motherboard you pick. Make sure the GPU you chose is compatible with the motherboard as well. The rest of the stuff is pretty generic and should work with anything.
    @Solnir posted the PC Part Picker link, and this is exactly what it does. It ensures everything you pick is compatible, and also points out deals (including combo deals) on the various sites to help the price line. Its a super amazing tool. Built my PC with it.
    image
    Solnir
  • CooperCooper IowaPosts: 4,098Member @@ - Legendary Achaean
    Do you have peripherals already?

    If not, how many monitors?

    What do you need it to do, and what do you want it to do? 

    Caelan
  • NazihkNazihk Posts: 740Member ✭✭✭✭✭ - Grand Achaean
    Aesgar said:
    AMD seems like the budget friendly processor, and competitive with Intel on performance from what I am reading. Doubt it is anything I would really notice as I spend the majority of my time on Achaea, though I would like the option to try some new games since I actually can. 
    AMD's Ryzen lineup is really solid for the price. I'm running a Ryzen 5 1600 with zero complaints. Most of the Ryzen chips come with one of their Wraith Stealth/Spire/Max coolers. These coolers are actually pretty damn good, good enough that you don't really need to buy a third-party cooling system. The Spire and Max will even let you overclock a bit, which is fucking amazing for a stock cooler.

    If you want best of the best gaming performance you're still going to want an Intel chip, but the Ryzen lineup is pretty fantastic for a budget machine. 
    Trey
  • CaelanCaelan Posts: 737Member ✭✭✭✭✭ - Grand Achaean
    edited November 13
    Planning a build as well since my last desktop is 10yrs old (build them for 'future proofing' as much as possible so in that 10yrs I only had to add more RAM). Built some others for a couple family/friends and local businesses for under $1500 easily. 

      Parts are STUPID expensive now. But definitely newegg.com and an AMD chip.  Iirc, the new AMD are actually outperforming Intel. But I may be mistaken and it may depend on which specific chip.

      I personally only use Asus motherboards because the two times I went with other "top rated" mobos and brands, they were either DOA or soon after.  Same reason I only use Western Digital harddrives in all my builds.  The only brand that hasnt let me down.  I will forever hate Maxtor because it died 6 months in and I lost years of Achaea logs and family pics.

    Reusing your old mouse, keyboard, monitors, etc can save you some on the budget (since it adds tax and possibly shipping on top of cost) and let you put it towards a better chip/mobo/ whatever.  I dont think Ive ever spent more than $75 on a case. But the new build I want is going to double as a forensic computer so I like a $250 Cooler Master :-/

  • AesgarAesgar Posts: 363Member ✭✭✭✭ - Eminent
    edited November 13
    Caelan said:
    Planning a build as well since my last desktop is 10yrs old (build them for 'future proofing' as much as possible so in that 10yrs I only had to add more RAM). Built some others for a couple family/friends and local businesses for under $1500 easily. 

      Parts are STUPID expensive now. But definitely newegg.com and an AMD chip.  Iirc, the new AMD are actually outperforming Intel. But I may be mistaken and it may depend on which specific chip.

      I personally only use Asus motherboards because the two times I went with other "top rated" mobos and brands, they were either DOA or soon after.  Same reason I only use Western Digital harddrives in all my builds.  The only brand that hasnt let me down.  I will forever hate Maxtor because it died 6 months in and I lost years of Achaea logs and family pics.

    Reusing your old mouse, keyboard, monitors, etc can save you some on the budget (since it adds tax and possibly shipping on top of cost) and let you put it towards a better chip/mobo/ whatever.  I dont think Ive ever spent more than $75 on a case. But the new build I want is going to double as a forensic computer so I like a $250 Cooler Master :-/
    Bought an expensive Asus "gaming" laptop under 2 years ago and it has been terrible. Returned the first one after a month due to the 4k display sucking for Mudlet (lol) and some other bugs. The second one I got which was the same laptop minus the 4k, has been even worse. Long story short, I would probably steer away from an Asus motherboard unless it really is the best option. Appreciate the other advice though.

    @Cooper No peripherals already, however I just invested in the most important peripheral of them all that will be arriving thursday.. a desk! 

    Probably only need two monitors. Looking for something that will be great for everyday computing, school, etcetera. Then of course, the reason I'm doing this in the first place, is to start dabbling in a little more gaming. Right now I only play PUBG, and Achaea but would love the option to get into some new stuff. Would like to be able to watch videos/streams on one screen while doing other stuff (potentially gaming) on the other without any major FPS drops (Unless this is a major cost increase).

    @Rangor We can push the budget up a little higher since I am going to have to invest in peripherals. (Maybe $1500 before peripherals?)
  • RangorRangor Posts: 2,886Member @@ - Legendary Achaean
  • NazihkNazihk Posts: 740Member ✭✭✭✭✭ - Grand Achaean
    IMO, there is no reason to be buying an i5-7600 nowadays.

    In Intel chips, their new Coffee Lake i3-8350K is a 4c/4t offering in a comparable price range with comparable performance that uses more modern Intel 300 chipset, which gives you the option of upgrading processors at a later date without having to change your motherboard out along with it.

    In AMD chips, the Ryzen 5 1600 offers comparable gaming performance in most regards, but as soon as you enter a situation where multi-threading really comes into play it crushes the 7600. 
    Aldwic
  • AesgarAesgar Posts: 363Member ✭✭✭✭ - Eminent
    edited November 13
    Alright been playing around a bit on part picker and this is what I came up with. Started with their middle-tier gaming build, and made a few adjustments. @Cooper @Rangor @Nazihk @Antidas

    https://pcpartpicker.com/list/QQGjtJ


  • AntidasAntidas Posts: 1,331Member @@ - Legendary Achaean
    edited November 14
    Not sure about Team RAM. From what quick research I did it sounds like a cheaper type which always has the possibility of causing problems. One of the biggest things I saw was that it has issues if you try to OC it. However, it does have a lifetime warranty which is the important part, so if you're ok with not trying to OC then I'd say go for it.

    Motherboard is fine, ASUS is a good manufacturer (although I'm partial to MSI). GPU is solid as well, I use Nvidia and haven't had any problems with it.

    Only other thing I noticed is your power supply is only 550w. I didn't do the math so I'm not sure if thats enough for your current use (make 100% sure you have done it to confirm, though), but I usually recommend going for a larger power supply than you think you might need. That way if you decide you want to add things to your computer down the road or switch something out for another part that uses a bit more power, you don't run into issues with your supply and need to buy a new one.

    Aesgar
  • AesgarAesgar Posts: 363Member ✭✭✭✭ - Eminent
    Antidas said:
    Not sure about Team RAM. From what quick research I did it sounds like a cheaper type which always has the possibility of causing problems. One of the biggest things I saw was that it has issues if you try to OC it. However, it does have a lifetime warranty which is the important part, so if you're ok with not trying to OC then I'd say go for it.

    Motherboard is fine, ASUS is a good manufacturer (although I'm partial to MSI). GPU is solid as well, I use Nvidia and haven't had any problems with it.

    Only other thing I noticed is your power supply is only 550w. I didn't do the math so I'm not sure if thats enough for your current use (make 100% sure you have done it to confirm, though), but I usually recommend going for a larger power supply than you think you might need. That way if you decide you want to add things to your computer down the road or switch something out for another part that uses a bit more power, you don't run into issues with your supply and need to buy a new one.
    Yeah still need to research power supplies. 

    Any good RAM recommendations? I know I'll want 16 GB, how important is CAS, speed, and DDR3 vs DDR4?
  • AntidasAntidas Posts: 1,331Member @@ - Legendary Achaean
    CAS (column access strobe) is pretty much just your latency. Its how much of a time gap there is from when the RAM asks for the data to when it is actually available to your RAM's output pins. You'll want a lower CAS, as (obviously) lower latency is better. That being said, I'd be careful about trying to go for the lowest CAS ram you can find - sometimes computers have difficulty functioning with it. I don't really have an explanation for you as to why that is, I just know its a thing lol. My guess is that really low CAS ram requires more voltage, which most boards don't support. I wouldn't go lower than CAS11 or so, to be safe. This max shouldn't be an issue so long as you aren't shelling out for top of the line RAM.

    RAM speed is pretty much how quickly the RAM makes a request to the computer to pull data from your drive. The higher the speed, the faster it'll be able to pull that file from the drive into your ram and open it up there. 

    DDR3 vs DDR4 is pretty much a speed vs latency difference. DDR4 is the newer technology, and tends to have much higher speeds, but also slightly higher latency because of it. It looks like your motherboard only supports DDR4 so unless you want to change that up, I'd stick with it. Its what I would recommend taking anyways, so no problems there imo.

    http://www.pcgamer.com/the-differences-between-ddr3-and-ddr4-ram/
    https://www.howtogeek.com/303455/how-does-ram-speed-and-timing-affect-my-pcs-performance/
    http://www.crucial.com/usa/en/memory-performance-speed-latency

    ^ a few articles I found really quick that give you some more in depth information if you're interested.

    Regarding RAM manufacturers, I like Corsair, G.SKill, Crucial, or PNY. But like I said before, keep in mind that the most important part of buying RAM is just making sure it has a lifetime warranty. Most, but not all, manufacturers offer it, and if it doesn't have it, that should pretty much rule out buying it.

  • NazihkNazihk Posts: 740Member ✭✭✭✭✭ - Grand Achaean
    I'm pretty iffy on Seasonic as a PSU brand. I'd go with an EVGA G2 Gold, myself. 
    Antidas
  • AntidasAntidas Posts: 1,331Member @@ - Legendary Achaean
    edited November 14
    Nazihk said:
    I'm pretty iffy on Seasonic as a PSU brand. I'd go with an EVGA G2 Gold, myself. 
    Thats what I use :D

    Well. I have the 750W one, not 550. But still haha

  • NazihkNazihk Posts: 740Member ✭✭✭✭✭ - Grand Achaean
    I use the 650W, but same, yeah. 
    Aesgar
  • AesgarAesgar Posts: 363Member ✭✭✭✭ - Eminent
    edited November 14
    Nazihk said:
    I use the 650W, but same, yeah. 

    Yeah that was what the build defaulted with, one of the parts I hadn't looked into yet. I saw those and they looked reliable, I'll probably go with the 650W. I doubt I'll do that much adding on to my build once it's done.


    Also @Antidas the part picker has my build at 339W, but I should probably double check that myself to be safe.
  • AesgarAesgar Posts: 363Member ✭✭✭✭ - Eminent
    Alright, this is the build I started with: https://pcpartpicker.com/guide/hRbtt6/great-amd-gaming-build

    This is what I have ended up with: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/pgHqcc

    I may tone it down a bit, I feel like $1400 is getting pretty up there before peripherals.
  • AntidasAntidas Posts: 1,331Member @@ - Legendary Achaean
    You could probably tone down your GPU and still have a pretty decent gaming computer. My GPU is only a 4Gb card and works great with most everything on good settings, although if I could afford an 8Gb card I would 100% have gone for one. Only other thing I can think of is is wait for Black Friday/Cyber Monday deals and see if you can get a good deal on something.

  • CaliraCalira Posts: 334Member, Secret Squirrel ✭✭✭ - Distinguished
    You should consider a 2.8 ghz P4 processor, 512 megs of 1066 mhz RDRAM, and a motherboard with a 566 mhz front-side bus. I hear it's smokingly fast.
  • NicolaNicola Posts: 575Administrator Achaean staff
    While I can't comment on build specifics, (if you're in the US) definitely don't purchase anything until the Black Friday/Cyber Monday sales start, this close to that weekend will only make you kick yourself.
    KyrraAesgarTysandr
  • NazihkNazihk Posts: 740Member ✭✭✭✭✭ - Grand Achaean
    That GPU is complete overkill unless your goals are things like 'must play every game at 120FPD in 4k on ultra settings'
    AesgarAntidasAldwic
  • AesgarAesgar Posts: 363Member ✭✭✭✭ - Eminent
    Nazihk said:
    That GPU is complete overkill unless your goals are things like 'must play every game at 120FPD in 4k on ultra settings'
    Good to know. I felt similar, but it is what it started with so figured I would hold onto it for the time being. I'll look into others.

    I think buying the 2-3 most expensive parts on black Friday/cyber Monday is going to be huge. Maybe a monitor too.



  • AdaAda Posts: 187Member ✭✭✭✭ - Eminent
    I once inquired why we have expensive branded machines all over the workplace when the same hardware could have been acquired and assembled in house for cheaper.. the IT guys gave me a pair of thermal goggles and I could see why. A couple of assembled machines stood out like red hot sore thumbs in a sea of blue.

    They said branded machines come with a uniform thermal profile and well balanced components, and are consequently less likely to fail due to electrical/thermal stress :open_mouth: it makes their job easier!
  • RangorRangor Posts: 2,886Member @@ - Legendary Achaean
    Ada said:
    I once inquired why we have expensive branded machines all over the workplace when the same hardware could have been acquired and assembled in house for cheaper.. the IT guys gave me a pair of thermal goggles and I could see why. A couple of assembled machines stood out like red hot sore thumbs in a sea of blue.

    They said branded machines come with a uniform thermal profile and well balanced components, and are consequently less likely to fail due to electrical/thermal stress :open_mouth: it makes their job easier!
    Where can I buy thermal goggles?!
    image
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